Jesse Edwin Bowen

Jesse Edwin Bowen was the son of William Booker Bowen and Ada Evelyn Smith. He was born on 25 Dec 1903 in Decatur, Texas. In February 1929 at the age of twenty-five years, Jesse married eighteen year old Eleanor Erma Van Dusen in Gallup, New Mexico where he worked as an undertaker in a funeral parlour. Later Jesse worked for the railroad. He was the father of nine children. Jesse passed away on 9 Feb 1996 in Phoenix, Arizona.

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J. R. Findsen

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Tennessee Marriage Record

 

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Image Source: FamilySearch

 

 

Tennessee has surprisingly good resources for genealogy researchers. These include extensive marriage records. On Family Search (a free LDS site) has over a million records in their Tennessee, County Marriages, 1790-1950 database. In this database, there are images you can view and save to your computer.

Looking at an image of the original document is valuable. You may find transcribing errors or pick up a tidbit of information that can help you in your research.

This database is invaluable for anyone researching their Tennessean roots.

The marriage record above belongs to Steven Kitsmiller Lowe and his bride, Pearl Myers. Their marriage took place on 23 June 1907 in Carter County, Tennessee.

Steven Kitsmiller Lowe was born 10 February 1881 in Carter County, Tennessee. He was the son of George J. Lowe and Jemima Jane Colbaugh.

Pearl Myers Lowe was born 20 August 1889 in Tennessee. I have not researched Pearl’s family, and I do not have much background information for her.

Steven and Pearl had two daughters, Edith (b. 1908) and Ethel (b. 1910) both born in Carter County, Tennessee

Around 1912, They family pulled up stacks and moved across the country to Southern California, Kings County. Making their home around the small town of Lemoore where they stayed for the rest of their lives.

If you are researching your family tree in Tennessee, take a look at the Family Search Tennessee, County Marriages, 1790-1950 database. It is free and provides helpful information.

 

Thank you for reading.

J. R. Findsen

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A Gold Mine of Information

 

In the world of genealogy, there are many treasure troves of information. Family research is not just about birth and death records. World War I draft registration cards can be a gold mine of information for family tree work.

If you are new to the genealogy world, you may ask, “What are World War I draft registration cards?” Good question.

According to the National Archives, “On May 18, 1917, the Selective Service Act was passed authorizing the President to increase temporarily the military establishment of the United States.”

“The information included on each registration differs somewhat but the general information shown includes order and serial numbers (assigned by the Selective Service System), full name, date and place of birth, race, citizenship, occupation, personal description, and signature.”

To read more about the World War I Draft Registration Cards, click on the link.

Here is my quick list of information found on registration cards:

  1. Where they lived between the 1910 and 1920 US Federal Census years.
  2. The exact date they were born and where.
  3. Tells if they are a US Citizen, natural born or an immigrant.
  4. Their occupation.
  5. Where and whom they work for.
  6. A description of their family.
  7. Their ethnicity.
  8. Their marital status.
  9. Record of any previous military service.
  10. Any physical problems that would exempt them from service.
  11. A physical description.
  12. Their signature.

 

Now, that you can see the awesome of World War I Draft Registration Cards, you may ask where you can find this fantastic database.

Search for FREE here on FamilySearch.

Note: While FamilySearch is free they recently started requiring an account to see search results.

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J. R. Lowe

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