Headstone: Mary Ellen Barrett

 

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Image Source: Findagrave

Mary Ellen Barrett was born 18 Sept 1881 to George Barrett and Lydia Melvina Halstead in Smith County Kansas.

Mary married Caleb Grant Van Dusen and had three children with him. The marriage did not last.

She married her second husband, James Henry Austin on 22 July 1922 in San Juan County New Mexico.

Mary died on 24 Feb 1959 in Albuquerque New Mexico. Fairview Memorial Park Cemetery in Albuquerque is her final resting place.

 

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J. R. Findsen

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The Death of a Kitten

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While reading a book of memories written by Agnes Ellen Gurney Pinkerton (my 2nd great grandmother) I came across a little poem written by her mother’s sister (Mary Williams Orcutt), Aunt Fanny (Francis Ellen Orcutt), as a child.

Fanny had a way with words; one always find her scribbling little sayings or poems.

Apparently, Fanny and her sister Mary (Agnes’s mother) had quite the little pet cemetery.

With each death of a pet or expired animal found, they went through great pomp and circumstance in an attempt at providing a “proper” burial.

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In the pet cemetery, there was an old roof shingle standing up on end marking the grave of a kitten who came to his demise early in life. Attached to the shingle was a piece of paper with a poem written in a child’s hand that acted as the eulogy to the deceased feline.

 

“Cassibianca, here he lies,
With stiffened legs and shut-up eyes.
Ma stepped on him and stopped his breath,
An that is the way he came to his death.”

 

After reading that little poem, I laughed so hard. It is horrible what happened to the little kitten. I could picture in my mind’s eye, two little girls in dressed in outfits typical to the era (abt 1850) standing over a fresh little grave, with serious expressions reading the poem out loud.

This find is a sweet little treasure!

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J. R. Lowe

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Lorene Guthrie Funeral Card

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Imer Lorene Guthrie was born 6 Feb 1911 in Dell, Mississippi County, Arkansas. She went by the name of Lorene.

She was the daughter of John Thomas Guthrie and Martha Matilda Morgan.

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Lorene passed away on 13 Nov 1989 in Grants Pass, Josephine County, Oregon. Hawthorne Memorial Gardens in Grants Pass is her final resting place.

 

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J. R. Lowe

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A Gold Mine of Information

 

In the world of genealogy, there are many treasure troves of information. Family research is not just about birth and death records. World War I draft registration cards can be a gold mine of information for family tree work.

If you are new to the genealogy world, you may ask, “What are World War I draft registration cards?” Good question.

According to the National Archives, “On May 18, 1917, the Selective Service Act was passed authorizing the President to increase temporarily the military establishment of the United States.”

“The information included on each registration differs somewhat but the general information shown includes order and serial numbers (assigned by the Selective Service System), full name, date and place of birth, race, citizenship, occupation, personal description, and signature.”

To read more about the World War I Draft Registration Cards, click on the link.

Here is my quick list of information found on registration cards:

  1. Where they lived between the 1910 and 1920 US Federal Census years.
  2. The exact date they were born and where.
  3. Tells if they are a US Citizen, natural born or an immigrant.
  4. Their occupation.
  5. Where and whom they work for.
  6. A description of their family.
  7. Their ethnicity.
  8. Their marital status.
  9. Record of any previous military service.
  10. Any physical problems that would exempt them from service.
  11. A physical description.
  12. Their signature.

 

Now, that you can see the awesome of World War I Draft Registration Cards, you may ask where you can find this fantastic database.

Search for FREE here on FamilySearch.

Note: While FamilySearch is free they recently started requiring an account to see search results.

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J. R. Lowe

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