River Fun

Mary M. Dargatz having fun at the river.

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J. R. Findsen

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Headstone: Mary Ellen Barrett

 

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Image Source: Findagrave

Mary Ellen Barrett was born 18 Sept 1881 to George Barrett and Lydia Melvina Halstead in Smith County Kansas.

Mary married Caleb Grant Van Dusen and had three children with him. The marriage did not last.

She married her second husband, James Henry Austin on 22 July 1922 in San Juan County New Mexico.

Mary died on 24 Feb 1959 in Albuquerque New Mexico. Fairview Memorial Park Cemetery in Albuquerque is her final resting place.

 

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J. R. Findsen

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Mary Ann Hitchcock

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Mary Ann Hitchcock Pinkerton

 

The lady pictured above is my 3rd great-grandmother Mary Ann Hitchcock Pinkerton.

She was the youngest out of seven children born to Alured Hitchcock and Sarah Warner Stevens 17 June 1824 in Vergennes, Vermont. Both of her parents come from a long line of New England Colonial families.

Mary Ann married David M. Pinkerton, Jr., a missionary preacher, on 27 October 1845 in Galesburg, Illinois. They spent the next twenty-five years of their married life as missionaries. Along the way, they had nine children.

Mary Ann passed away at her daughter Mary home on 8 November 1908 in Northfield, Minnesota.

 

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J. R. Findsen

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Reinhold Dargatz Border Crossing

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Name: Reinhold Dargatz

Arrival Date: 25 Nov 1933

Port of Arrival: Eastport, Idaho

Age: 32

Birth Place: Millet, Alberta

Birth Country: Canada

Gender: Male

Race/Nationality: German

Record Type: Cards

 

Border crossing cards between the United States and Canada is an excellent way to track the movements of ancestors.

Reinhold Dargatz was the son of German immigrants. Herman F. Dargatz and Amelia Klukas immigrated from Hamburg German in 1895. They made their home in Millet Alberta where they had a large family.

Reinhold married a lady by the name of Martha M. Jesse in Oregon where they made their home.

 

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J. R. Findsen

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How to Preserve a Husband Part 1

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One of the things I love about my dearly departed mother-in-law is even after two years she is still giving me wonderful little gifts. While looking through a stack of her old cookbooks, I found a golden nugget of wisdom, a recipe for preserving a husband. It is a lovely piece of advice pickled in farmhouse humor.

The recipe for a relationship is timeless. The quote cleverly restates the golden rule. That universal proverb we all learned as children. Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.

The quote is not attributed to an author. It only reveals that it was found in an older cookbook. My mother-in-law’s well-loved cookbook, tattered and worn, appears than dirt. I can only wonder how old the quote is. Finding its origins could take considerable digging. In what time era would you place the farmhouse quote?

It is a recipe for preservation worth preserving.

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J. R. Findsen

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Deadly Tuberculosis

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Image Source: knowitall.org

Genealogists and family historians no only need to know how to find and preserve records, expand family trees, and write histories; they need to have a solid sense of history.

What was going on in the world and locally during the life of your ancestors?

Tuberculosis is a disease that has touched many lives throughout history. It is a disease that, today, does not get as much attention as cancer, influenza or casualties of war. Nonetheless, TB was an avid killer up until relatively recently.

In medical arenas, Tuberculosis is called Mycobacterium Tuberculosis. However throughout history, consumption, phthisis, and the white plague.

What is TB? According to the CDC:
The bacteria usually attack the lungs. But TB bacteria can attack any part of the body such as the kidney, spine, and brain. If not treated properly, TB disease can be fatal. TB disease was once the leading cause of death in the United States.
TB is spread through the air from one person to another. The bacteria are put into the air when a person with TB disease of the lungs or throat coughs, sneezes, speaks, or sings. People nearby may breathe in these bacteria and become infected.
However, not everyone infected with TB bacteria becomes sick. People who are infected, but not ill, have what is called latent TB infection. People who have latent TB infection do not feel sick, do not have any symptoms, and cannot spread TB to others. But some people with latent TB infection go on to get TB disease.

It appears that Tuberculosis may have emerged 9,000 years ago in Africa. Trade routes, animals such as goats and cows, seals and sea lions all aided in the spread of the disease.

There are written records all around the ancient world from India, China, and Greece. Even in pre-Columbia America have records of TB written in the DNA of skeletal remains thousands of years old.

Fast forward to 1830. In New York City (population 202,589) alone 16,400 people died in that year alone. 8.1% of New York’s population perished from Tuberculosis.

In 1882 Robert Koch asserted that Tuberculosis is an infection disease meaning that it is transmitted from person to person. Armed with this information sanitariums popped up isolating the infected. Still, they did not have an effective way to combat the disease. One out of seven who contracted TB died.

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Image Source: Blue Ridge Sanatorium

By 1900 Tuberculosis was at a crisis level in Great Britain. So much so that in 1901 a royal commission was formed to study TB transmission between humans and animals.

A hundred years ago Tuberculosis was considered the biggest killer in America. It is estimated that in the United States alone at least 450 people died of Tuberculosis every day. To put that into perspective, that means 164,250 lost their lives every year.

It was only in the 1940s that scientists discovered the first medicines to treat TB. We still use the same medication today. However, since 2000, there is a rise in tuberculosis cases with the disease becoming more resistant to the medicines available.

Unless new treatments are discovered, we could face similar devastating effects of TB as did our grandparents and great-grandparents.

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To Learn More:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Research History

Harvard University Library

Wikipedia

 

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Thank you for reading.

J. R. Findsen

 

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